Girls Who Looked Under Rocks: The Lives of Six Pioneering Naturalists by Jeannine Atkins, Paula Conner

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An inspiring famous women book for girls, Girls Who Looked Under Rocks also makes the perfect feminist gift for girls.

Girls Who Looked Under Rocks: The Lives of Six Pioneering Naturalists is for a world no longer confined by gender stereotypes, and a place where science is for girls, too! Parents and children will love this portrayal of six women who grew up playing in the dirt and went on to become award winning scientists and writers. All of these women were discouraged from pursuing careers in science, but they all persisted in their passion.

If there is a pre-teen or adolescent in your life, especially a girl, take a look at this empowering, inspiring chapter book. It portrays the youths and careers of six remarkable women whose curiosity about nature fueled a passion to steadfastly overcome obstacles to careers in traditionally men-only occupations. The six-Maria Merian (b.1647), Anna Comstock (b.1854), Frances Hamerstrom (b.1907), Rachel Carson (b.1907), Miriam Rothschild (b.1908), and Jane Goodall (b.1934)--all became renowned scientists, artists and writers. A wonderful resource for young researchers and biographers, these stories can be a starting point for issues of gender, science, and the environment.

Jeannine Atkins was a girl who looked under rocks. Particular trees and stones outside her house were familiar as her bedroom and made good spots to wonder. When she grew up, writing became her way to keep exploring and dreaming. She particularly likes combing libraries for stories about amazing girls and women. In addition to this book, they have inspired her picture books which include Aani and the Tree Huggers and Mary Anning and the Sea Dragon. She lives with her husband and their daughter in Massachusetts.

Paula Conner's parents are gifted professional musicians, so her love for music and songwriting seemed natural. It was a delightful surprise as a young adult, however, to discover that she could draw. With no formal training, she has been a commissioned portrait artist for more than twenty-five years, although this is her first published work as an illustrator. Her medium of choice is charcoal because it allows her to capture light and shadow dramatically, bringing a three-dimensional, life-like quality to her work. To capture a poignant expression, a fleeting display of emotion in the eyes, is what excites her. A mother of four and a devoted wife, her greatest love will always be her family; but her art is unquestionably another.